3 Ways to Get Better Sleep, Tonight

How did you sleep last night?
 
Did you wake up well-rested and energized? Or, are you feeling tired and groggy? Did you have trouble falling or staying asleep?
 
The American Sleep Association (ASA) recommends 7-9 hours of sleep for adults. But, we definitely have trouble getting our zzzz’s in each night. The ASA estimates that sleep problems affects up to 70 million American adults!
 
Sleep is essential for our physical and mental health. Study after study tells us how sleep deprivation causes us to eat more, shrinks our brains, can cause false memories, and is linked to type 2 diabetes. 
 
Sleep deprivation has been used as a form of torture, and yet often, we willingly sleep too little or continue bad habits that stop us from getting good sleep. 
 
It really is our ethical responsibility to get plenty of sleep and rest. Our teams, colleagues, organizations, and our families need us to be at our best, to be able to think clearly, and make sound decisions. Lack of sleep can deeply compromise our decision-making ability and mood. 
 
But, despite the best of intentions there are times when getting the recommended 7-9 hours just doesn’t happen. Sometimes it just doesn’t feel possible (this pile of laundry is blocking the path to my bed and I can’t sleep until it’s done) or it’s totally out of our control (my toddler needs water….again). 
 
In today’s video I share three things you can do to get better sleep tonight, even on the nights when it’s less than you would like. 

1. Sleep in Complete Darkness

Melatonin is a hormone that rises at night and helps us go to (and stay) asleep. However, it is very light sensitive. For it to rise and be effective, your surroundings have to be completely dark. Make sure your bedroom is completely dark so that melatonin can do its job. Turn off night-lights, cover lights from electronics, and get room-darkening shades. If you need a night-light, choose one with a red bulb. Red light does not interfere with melatonin production.

2. Unplug Before Bed

Remember that little hormone melatonin we just talked about? Well, staring at a computer or your phone before bed also obstructs melatonin from rising properly. Your bedtime Facebook scrolling could be the cause for your sleepless night! Turn off all electronics at least an hour before bed to get your body ready for sleep. Instead, read a book, do some stretching, or enjoy a cup of tea. Next, get a real alarm clock. You know, the kind you plug into the wall and has numbers on it? They still sell those antiques at most stores! That way you don’t have to use your phone as an alarm clock. Instead, charge it overnight in a different room so you’re not tempted to check your email and compromise your melatonin production. 

3. Create a Comfortable Bed and Bedroom

Your bed should be a place that you look forward to relaxing and sleeping in. If there is something about your bed or bedroom that is uncomfortable, then change it. Is your mattress old and uncomfortable? Are your sheets too hot or too cold? Maybe your pillows are lumpy or too flat.
 
Be sure to watch the video where I share how changing our blankets has helped me and my husband sleep so much better!
 
I want to hear from you! Do you have any tricks for getting a good night’s sleep? Share your tips and tricks in the comments!
 

Tanya McCausland is the COO at Diamond6 Leadership and a Holistic Nutrition Consultant. She is board certified by the National Association of Nutrition Professionals and teaches executive wellness to leaders at all levels. 

Get better sleep, tonight.

The National Sleep Foundation recommends how much sleep we need— from infants to the elderly. Some of the ranges for children and teens have changed over the years, but the standard seven to nine hours per night for adults (age 18-64) and seven to eight hours for adults 65+ stands firm.  (Click HERE to view recommended sleep times by age.) 

While some still use the adage “I’ll sleep when I’m dead”, the reality is that lack of sleep is linked to health condition that could get you there sooner.

Sleep is absolutely critical for our health and well-being. While you’re sleeping, your liver and brain clear toxins and your immune system is strengthened. Lack of sleep has been associated with long-term chronic medical conditions such as diabetes, high blood pressure, and heart disease. Plus, if you aren’t sleeping well, chances are it is having a negative effect on your stress levels, productivity, focus, and mood.

If you have trouble falling asleep, are waking up in the middle of the night, or aren’t waking up rested, you could be putting your health at risk. Try these five tips for getting better sleep, tonight:

1) Sleep in the dark

Melatonin is a hormone that rises at night and helps us go to and stay asleep. However, it is very light sensitive. For it to rise and be effective, it has to be dark. To that end, make sure your room is completely dark. Turn off night-lights, cover lights from electronics, and get room-darkening shades. If you need a night-light, choose one with a red bulb. Red light does not interfere with melatonin production.

2) Unplug before bed

For many people, the last thing they see at night is the screen of their computer or cell phone. These electronics emit strong light directly into your eyes that can also depress melatonin production. Turn off all electronics at least an hour before bed to get your body ready for sleep. Instead, read a book, do some stretching or enjoy a cup of tea.

3) Stay in rhythm

Sticking to a natural sleep/wake cycle (circadian rhythm) keeps your body in balance. Having a regular bedtime and wake time helps your body stay in that rhythm, ensuring better sleep and more energy when awake. What is important is to stick with the same bedtime and wake time even on the weekends and during vacation. Sleeping in on the weekends and on days off can throw your body out of balance again.

4) Go to bed early

You might claim to be a night owl or be more productive after midnight. However, your body can’t clear toxins and do repairs if you’re surfing the Internet or mopping the floor at 2 a.m. Try to go to bed by 10 or 10:30 p.m. to give your body plenty of time to do its job so you can do yours—when the sun is up.

5) Create a comfortable bed

Your bed should be a place that you look forward to relaxing and sleeping in. If there is something about your bed or bedroom that is uncomfortable, then change them. Is your mattress old and soft? Are your sheets too hot or too cold? Maybe your pillows are lumpy and uncomfortable. Invest in your bed and make it a place of peace and relaxation that you look forward to.

 


Tanya McCausland is the COO at Diamond6 Leadership and a Holistic Nutrition Consultant. She is board certified by the National Association of Nutrition Professionals and teaches executive wellness to leaders at all levels. 

Get better sleep, tonight.

The National Sleep Foundation recently released new recommendations for how much sleep we need—Screen Shot 2015-12-08 at 1.31.00 PMfrom infants to the elderly. Some of the ranges for children and teens have changes but the standard seven to nine hours per night for adults stands firm. (To see the breakdown of recommendations by age go to www.sleepfoundation.org)

While some still use the adage “I’ll sleep when I’m dead,” the reality is that lack of sleep is linked to health condition that could get you there sooner.

Sleep is absolutely critical for our health and well-being. While you’re sleeping, your liver and brain clear toxins and your immune system is strengthened. Lack of sleep has been associated with long-term chronic medical conditions such as diabetes, high blood pressure, and heart disease. Plus, if you aren’t sleeping well, chances are it is having a negative effect on your stress levels, productivity, focus, and mood.

If you have trouble falling asleep, are waking up in the middle of the night, or aren’t waking up rested, you could be putting your health at risk. Try these five tips for getting better sleep tonight:

1) Sleep in the dark: Melatonin is a hormone that rises at night and helps us go to and stay asleep. However, it is very light sensitive. For it to rise and be effective, it has to be dark. To that end, make sure your room is completely dark. Turn off night-lights, cover lights from electronics, and get room-darkening shades. If you need a night-light, choose one with a red bulb. Red light does not interfere with melatonin production.

2) Unplug before bed: For many people, the last thing they see at night is the screen of their computer or cell phone. These electronics emit strong light directly into your eyes that can also depress melatonin production. Turn off all electronics at least an hour before bed to get your body ready for sleep. Instead, read a book, do some stretching or enjoy a cup of tea.

3) Stay in rhythm: Sticking to a natural sleep/wake cycle (circadian rhythm) keeps your body in balance. Having a regular bedtime and wake time helps your body stay in that rhythm, ensuring better sleep and more energy when awake. What is important is to stick with the same bedtime and wake time even on the weekends and during vacation. Sleeping in on the weekends and on days off can throw your body out of balance again.

4) Go to bed early: You might claim to be a night owl or be more productive after midnight. However, your body can’t clear toxins and do repairs if you’re surfing the Internet or mopping the floor at 2 a.m. Try to go to bed by 10 or 10:30 p.m. to give your body plenty of time to do its job so you can do yours—when the sun is up.

5) Create a comfortable bed: Your bed should be a place that you look forward to relaxing and sleeping in. If there is something about your bed or bedroom that is uncomfortable, then change them. Is your mattress old and soft? Are your sheets too hot or too cold? Maybe your pillows are lumpy and uncomfortable. Invest in your bed and make it a place of peace and relaxation that you look forward to.


Tanya McCausland, Diamond6’s communications manager, is a nutrition consultant and owner of Home Cooked Healing. She helps her clients create healthy and sustainable lifestyle habits through 1:1 coaching, workshops and talks.